Live Review: Lucy Dacus @ Teragram Ballroom, March 22, 2018

Live Review: Lucy Dacus @ Teragram Ballroom, March 22, 2018

These are boom times for singer-songwriters, almost all of them ladies, young, wise beyond their years, armed with electric guitars and rafts of rich, personal, insightful, often moving lyrics. Enter Lucy Dacus, inching up to the front of the class with an engaging full band performance to a fairly packed Teragram Ballroom this past drizzly Thursday.

Backed tightly by able players–Sadie Powers, holding down a steady low end on the rare fretless electric bass; Jacob Blizzard, on tastefully effected atmospheric electric guitar; Ricardo Lagomasino, providing restraint and punch behind the drum kit–the Richmond 22-year-old presented Historian, her excellent new sophomore LP, with a large continuous chunk making up the first half of the set list.

Lucy Dacus | lucydacus.com

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Review: Bananarama @ The Novo, February 20, 2018

Review: Bananarama @ The Novo, February 20, 2018

Bananarama, the iconic British female pop trio formed in the 80’s, performed at The Novo downtown this past Tuesday, their first show in Los Angeles since 1989, impossibly. (A comically curmudgeonly LA Times review of that gig at the Universal Amphitheater survives online; a live bootleg recording of that show, a nice curio artifact, recently turned up online.)

The occasion of the tour is the reunion of all three original band members–Sara Dallin, Keren Woodward and Siobhan Fahey, who left the group in ‘88, four albums in, on the cusp of their first tour. Fahey later went on to release music as Shakespeare’s Sister, while Dallin and Woodward have kept Bananarama continuously active as a duo over the years. Fahey came back into the fold for well-received U.K. shows last year and they look poised to repeat that with a quick jaunt of four U.S. dates. (A nice Guardian piece talking to the ladies on the occasion of their reunion last year is here.)

The house was packed with a fun, motley audience–middle aged suburban couples, old school KROQ heads (whose ex-DJ Richard Blade, a local legend, served as opening act, his recent autobiography conveniently available at the merch table), sprinklings of younger hipsters, and the expected strong gay contingent.

The three ladies, backed by an able four-piece band serving the songs well, worked through a winning, high energy greatest hits set…

Bananarama | bananarama.co.uk

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Live Review: Luna @ Morrocan Lounge, January 12, 2018

Live Review: Luna @ Morrocan Lounge, January 12, 2018

The second of back-to-back nights at Moroccan Lounge, Luna, the longtime literate guitar pop outfit, once identified with New York cool in the 90’s, now mostly LA-based, delivered a treat of a live show at the intimate venue, kicking off a quick eight date West Coast jaunt (they pick it up again January 23 in Seattle).

The sold-out smaller room, intentionally or not, gave the band–Dean Wareham, of course, vocals/guitar, alongside the current lineup, steady since the turn of the millennium–Sean Eden, lead guitar; Britta Phillips, bass/vocals; Lee Wall, drums–a bit of a garage-y feel, coming across at times louder and rawer than usual for them. It worked, particularly on longer, louder jams like “Friendly Advice” and “Freakin’ and Peakin’” (from Penthouse, probably most widely considered their classic LP, is well represented with five cuts tonight).

After a decade long hiatus, Luna reactivated in 2015 for a well received live tour and have been active since. Last summer they delivered their first new recordings in thirteen years: an eclectic collection of cover versions, A Sentimental Education (smart covers long being a key component of the Luna catalog) and an e.p. of new original instrumentals, A Place Of Greater Safety.

Luna | lunamusic.com

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Live Review: Thom Yorke @ Fonda Theatre, December 12, 2017

Live Review: Thom Yorke @ Fonda Theatre, December 12, 2017

Photo by Sung. Full set here.

The first of a pair of intimate warm up gigs (the second tonight in Oakland) in advance of his Day For Night festival headlining set this weekend, Thom Yorke treated the Fonda Theatre with his solo electronic live show, the first headline presentation of his beat-based music in the U.S.

A minimalist stage setup of three podiums of gear, backed by three projection screens, Yorke was flanked by the familiar Nigel Godrich, producer extraordinaire, seemingly managing the bulk of the electronic foundation from his station (occasionally handling some groovy bass), and the less familiar Tarik Barri, a Dutch audiovisual composer, creating live, generative visuals. The all-black-clad three-piece ran through a 90-minute set of Yorke’s dark, punchy electronica, backed by Barri’s engrossing colors and shapes projections. The combination of bass heavy, groove-based tunes, constantly evolving imagery, and, of course, Yorke’s stage presence made for a compelling performance.

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Live Review: Mogwai @ Belasco Theater, November 21, 2017

Live Review: Mogwai @ Belasco Theater, November 21, 2017

Scottish indie post-rock stalwarts Mogwai brought their always powerful, mostly instrumental live show to a sold out Belasco Theater downtown last Tuesday. Touring in support of their latest full length release, the excellent Every Country’s Sun, their first for U.S. label Temporary Residence, the career spanning set drew heavily from that release while weaving in one track from each of their other 8 albums.

A honed live act, few bands match their sheer power or range of dynamics and can deliver as cathartic and visceral an experience. This night finds them in fine form, perhaps as tight and expressive as ever. It’s energy all the way through, no drag, with a wide variety of volume, tempos and electric and synth textures.

Mellow early track “Cody” finds Stuart Braithwaite confidently delivering a naked live vocal (he’s the only one to address the audience between songs, warmly thanking us). New LP opener “Coolverine” is lean and mean live, driven by Dominic Aitchison’s driving bass. “Party in the Dark” is as pure a melodic pop moment in their catalog. A near ten-minute “Two Rights Make One Wrong” builds to a pleasing electronics and noise freakout. It all ends with two classics in the encore–the midtempo meditation “Hunted by a Freak” featuring Barry Burns on flanged vocals, into the mandatory closer, the eponymous “Mogwai Fear Satan,” the quiet-loud-really quiet-REALLY LOUD three-guitar attack from their debut LP. Thoroughly satisfying. . .

Mogwai | mogwai.co.uk

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